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Posted in Facts about Raising Rabbits, Rabbit Recipes | 4 comments

How healthy is rabbit meat?

raising rabbits for meatWe are all concerned about our health (or at least we should be!) and one great thing about raising your own rabbit meat is not only that you’ll know exactly what has gone into your rabbit, but you’ll also be eating a leaner protein-rich diet. Pound-for-pound, rabbit meat has FAR MORE protein and LESS fat than other meats. This means you’ll not only be spending less for food, but you’ll have the extra health benefit too!

Take a look at this chart on the nutritional values of rabbit meat and other popular meats:

Calories, Protein & Fat Values for Meat per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Calories
Protein
Fat (g)
RABBIT
187
27
8
Beef (lean)
275
25
20
Pork chops (grilled)
340
28
24
Pork leg (roast)
290
27
20
Lamb breast (roast)
398
22
30
Lamb chops (grilled)
368
21
28
Lamb cutlets (grilled)
375
23
31
Venison
200
34
6.5
Chicken
140
26
12
Turkey (roast)
165
28
6
Duck (roast)
330
20
30
Goose (roast)
350
30
25
Pheasant (roast)
250
30
9

Rabbit meat is so healthy and lean that some doctors actually prescribe a rabbit meat diet to people who are overweight and obese. Because the fat and calorie levels are so low, but protein so high, one can radically change their life by eating a rabbit meat diet and exercising.

Does that mean that it would be healthy to eat only rabbit meat all the time with no additional other foods? Actually no. Because rabbit meat is so lean, your body can actually suffer if you eat nothing but rabbit meat all the time because it does not contain enough fat. So the good news is, you’re encouraged to eat other foods that you might not otherwise get to eat because of their fat content — thanks to rabbit meat!

raising rabbits for meat ebook package

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  • Zack

    Is it hard to catch the rabbits in your cage when it’s time to slaughter them? That’s my only hesitation about starting this. Don’t they bite you and scratch, etc? I would think theyd be hard to catch.
    Thanks!

  • http://www.raisingrabbitsebook.com Tiffany

    If your rabbits are familiar with you, they should be fairly easy to handle. And your cages should be built so that they can’t get out of arms reach while inside. Obviously the quietest methods of culling are preferred so that your rabbits don’t get spooked by something like a gun shot.

  • jeannine

    i have read ur news letters and lov the info.i have gotten a new z. from a friend and she had gotten several free. now i have bred her. nothing and now hoping again for a litter/kits. can a doe get to old? i have no idea how old she is,and no history.

  • http://www.raisingrabbitsebook.com Tiffany

    Hi Jeannine,
    There’s a few things that can lead to a doe not being able to conceive. If a rabbit is overweight, this can add a layer of fat around the ovaries which can lead to problems conceiving. If you can NOT grab a handful of loose skin on her back, the doe is too fat and if she did conceive, she would likely develop toxemia from the obesity. In this instance, fat builds up around the ovaries and chokes off the horns of the uterus. You can try changing her diet to include very few carbs and get the rabbit exercising, either by providing things for it to play with in the cage (and doing things like putting the food bowl on top of something she has to jump up to) or within a protected run in your yard.

    Generally if a rabbit has not been bred by the time it is about 1 year old, it becomes harder for them to conceive. So it’s possible that this rabbit has past its prime — but I wouldn’t give up until after 3 or so failed attempts. To boost fertility, you can try a few things.
    1) Put a tablespoon of cider vinegar in a gallon of drinking water and use it as the sole source of water for a few days. Then try again.
    2) Feed her grape vine tendrils. They’re said to be very stimulating for does.
    3) Feed wheat germ. This is said to boost fertility in both the does and the bucks.

    Hope this helps & best of luck!!